Work Hard – Play Hard. Swakara Atwell-Bennett.

These are a few interview style questions that we put to Swakara about her battle with work-life balance as she slogs it about in the city with her creative group Better Shared. (Which we’re hosting a screening of their new series tomorrow at WeWork Spitalfields! RSVP/ Get tickets HERE

Start-up projects and entrepreneurship are a big talking point right now with a move away from faceless corporate jobs towards the dream of ‘making your stamp on your industry’. But what is it really like for a young adult trying to make their way in an ever-condensing market of brands and influencers? Read Swakara’s answers to find out.

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What is your role now and what are the main responsibilities for you?

I am the Founder and Creative Director of BetterShared.co a platform for creatives of African / Caribbean descent. I also Freelance as a Designer / Art Director under Swakara Ltd.

My role mainly involves a lot of researching, I am always on the lookout for new creatives and general inspiration – It’s something I can’t switch off, you can spot something or someone anywhere. Most of my time is spent planning, editing and curating content for our interview features, social media and any events or campaigns we have scheduled. I have become a bit of a list addict which helps me keep on top of everything and alongside my marketing assistant, we plan our social a month in advance. The favourite part of my role, however, has to be interviewing, whether that is in person or over Skype / Google Hangouts. As a Freelance Designer, I work on a mixture of projects from UI design to branding and occasionally motion graphics and print.

How long have you been doing this for and what did you do before?

It will be two years this August, prior to this I worked full-time as a Graphic Designer at a branding agency in Shoreditch. I loved my job, but working within the creative industry also allowed me to witness the lack of diversity and lack of representation. The average graphic designer is still a white middle aged male so a black female Graphic Designer in the UK I am something of a rarity.

Can you think of any key challenges you had to overcome and how did you battle them to get to where you are?

I would say I am still battling them as there are new challenges every day, BetterShared exists to inspire, promote and connect people so the business element is something that has only recently manifested. Asking people for help was something I wasn’t so keen on at the beginning but it has been crucial – especially if you are launching something on your own. It’s not a bad thing if you can’t do it all or you need help once in awhile, without the help of my team who jumped onto BetterShared from the idea phase – it would have stayed as just that, an idea.

Another example was our birthday event, we underestimated the scale and it ended up going way over budget. We were trying to fit too many things into one event until we realised that sometimes less is more, on the day we scaled it back and the event was a success, the people, the music, and vibes were magical. Although I’m a lover of lists, at times you need to be able to think on your feet.

What is the dream, or where would you like to see yourself in five or ten years?

The dream would be to be one of if not the largest creative network in the world, somewhere that creatives know they can connect to one another and find future icons.

Personally, I would love to be balancing a business and motherhood as I would hope to have at least one or two lil’ ones by then.

How do you find balancing lifestyle and downtime with your job?

Most of the time even when I am supposed to be ‘taking time out’ I am thinking about BetterShared, since I have started I have found it hard to switch off from it completely. I do make the effort, however, to ensure I still see my friends and family and turn my notifications off when I’m relaxing, especially on holiday. It’s hard, but I think it’s necessary to give your mind a rest or at least find time to take up a hobby, it’s not always easy I do find weeks or months when downtime feels non-existent but then I will give myself a few days of chill after a hectic period. I’m definitely making more of an effort this year to focus on my well-being.

If you could give one piece of advice to a young spark looking to start their business, what would that be?

Don’t be afraid to just try things, the hardest part (as cheesy as it sounds) is just starting. I posted a launch date on Insta before we had even edited our first piece of video content. It was scary and looking back I may have done things differently but it forced me to make an idea a reality. Also, stick to it, a lot of people expect overnight success and it generally takes a lot longer than you’d expect. If you’re looking for an easy ride you’re probably in the wrong profession, it’s a brilliant feeling to know something you have imagined or dreamt of is finally happening but you have to be prepared to work your ass off to get it there.

What has been your favourite event you have attended this month? If not month, this year?

Bloom The Film launch last year was brilliant, I loved the accompanying exhibition which featured female artists from across the globe who created pieces in response to the coming-of-age film. The film itself is moving and the work was beautiful, they also included little details such as the bike from the film and flowers were scattered across the exhibition. Huge s/o to Jesse Gassongo-Alexander, the Writer, Director and Curator of the film and exhibition. Also Screened Nights – a summer screening of shorts by up and coming Directors. They had summer and winter events, it such a good concept can’t wait for their 2017 edition!

And finally, what do you think is the best part about being an upcoming, self-employed business owner right now?

The best part for me is knowing that I am working on something I’ve built that I’m truly passionate about – you spend over half of your life working so it may as well be on something you enjoy. Also in the age of social, it’s much easier to reach an audience and connect with people whether that’s for advice, partnerships or even testing ideas.

Thank you so much for talking to us and telling us about your experiences! We can’t wait for the screening! 

Make sure to check out Better Shared’s website here and follow them on Twitter.

And RSVP for the screening here!

Do you have any tips or advice on how to overcome challenges in the working world? Let us know by talking to us on Twitter!

Why not email the author about featuring on the blog or getting in touch with yada Events app. rhys.terrar@yada.events

Try out the app and see how you can use it for your next event management project.

Download it on the App Store or Google Play and follow us

online:

www.yada.events

Work Hard. Play Hard. – Sam Way

We speak to singer-songwriter Sam Way about his work/life balance as he makes his way, carving out a life, and a career in the big smoke.

Music and the arts are a big talking point right now with a move away from faceless corporate jobs towards the dream of ‘making your stamp on your industry’. But what is it really like for a young adult trying to make their way in an ever-condensing market of signers and songwriters? Read Sam’s answers to find out.

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How would you describe your style of music and who are some of your main inspirations?

 For me, before style, comes the song. Everything starts by the working with an instrument, working with the words, and the meaning of the song itself. In terms of production, the new album leans towards an ‘epic indie pop’ sound, but I’m always open to finding the ‘right’ production values for the song itself, but then again, is there a ‘right’ answer. I guess you just have to trust your ears. I grew up relishing the word play and dynamism of EMINEM, got really into this the sound of dubstep and it’s pioneers like BENGA, but lately I’ve been so inspired by reading Patty Smiths incredible bio, ‘Just Kids’ But the most inspiring things to me in terms of songwriting are the relationships I have, the people around me and the stories we carry.

 

How long have you been doing this for and what did you do before?

 My first release was in 2014 – I had originally moved up to London to pursue the unlikely career – it felt weird at the time anyway – as a male model. I was scouted when I was 16 and moved up here to the big smoke when I was 21. I only really picked up the guitar and started songwriting a years or two into living here, kind of as therapy, to process everything that was going on in my life at the time.

 

Can you think of any key challenges you had to overcome and how did you battle them to get to where you are?

 Absolutely, challenges are everywhere. I guess in a way I’m proud of the fact I just did what I did, I believed in myself from the very beginning, and always did things my own way. No pun intended. (lol) I met a few people in the industry who said they would help and ultimately just provided me with resistance, or who made a lot of promises and then didn’t come through. That just taught me, ‘you always have to drive the bus’ I obviously fucked up a whole lot too, broke strings onstage, had moments of doubt and frustration, highs and lows – but I never stopped loving having found an creative outlet, and always chipped away at what has become my craft,

What is the dream, or where would you like to see yourself in five or ten years?

 There are ample dreams, I want to play Glasto, the Pyramid stage – the crowd to sing your song back at you. That would fill me with tears I think. That would be a dream. I want one of my songs to be on the end credits of some incredible film, the sort where everyone leaves the cinema in awe. I want to tour the world, singing everyday, meeting new people and working with other creators to create work that challenges us as artists and the people who listen to it. This is a long way off, but one day, I want to be the ‘cool, weird old granddad’ who sings to my children’s children –  makes them laugh, makes them think about life, and make them fall in love with music 

 How do you find balancing lifestyle and downtime with your music?

 For me it’s all about, health, micro-goals, focusing, yoga, and space – one that I have to create just so I can be creative. Time management is key when your entire life is in flux, and planning, if you don’t plan ahead, by more than 3 months at least, then your not going about things the right way.

 

If you could give one piece of advice to a young spark looking to start in the music industry, what would that be?

 Use everything you’ve got going for you, start with you friends, if there’re not going to support you, you have an uphill struggle ahead. Be brave, invest in yourself, and be realistic too. Don’t stress, when is stress ever worth it. Don’t even focus on making it, whatever that means to you. But set your own definition of success and stick to that. Believe. Work with other people. Never Stop learning, and…of course….drive that bus….

 

What has been your favourite event you have attended this month? If not month, this year?

 I enjoyed the DIESEL party that was in a warehouse space in east London back in Feb – for fashion week. It was a totally unplanned adventure, and I even made a music video out if it too. 😉 (Now that’s a hustle)

And finally, what do you think is the best part about being an upcoming musician right now?

 Life is honestly, exciting….what more can you want?….

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Thank you so much for talking to us and telling us about your experiences! We love the new single, pretty liability which came out today! (which you can listen to here) and make sure to check out Sam on Twitter and Instagram

Do you have any tips or advice on how to overcome challenges in the working world? Let us know by talking to us on Twitter!

Why not email the author about featuring on the blog or getting in touch with yada Events app: rhys.terrar@yada.events

Try out the app and see how you can use it for your next event management project.

Download it on the App Store or Google Play and follow us

online:

www.yada.events

 

Work Hard – Play Hard. Lucie Chiocchetti (Bonjour Lucie)

These are a few interview style questions that we put to Lucie (Bonjour Lucie) about her battle with work life balance as she slogs it about in the city as graphic designer and as a creative art director.

Start-up projects and entrepreneurship are a big talking point right now with a move away from faceless corporate jobs towards the dream of ‘making your stamp on your industry’. But what is it really like for a young adult trying to make their way in an ever-condensing market of agencies  and freelancers? Read Lucie’s answers to find out.

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What is your role now and what are the main responsibilities for you?

My role? I don’t know if I could shrink it to “one” role: I’m both the director and the employees of my business at the moment, so I wear all of the company hats: sales, strategy, marketing, business development, actual work for clients, etc. I’d say that my main responsibility is to be in charge of business development (finding clients) so my business keeps running.

How long have you been doing this for and what did you do before?

It’s been 9 months, but truly I’ve been only business developing for 2 months as I was working with one major retain client for the previous 7 months.

Before that I was a simple in-house designer, I’ve been working as a designer across the design industry for 3 years after graduating and worked in institutions, retailers and creative agencies. I tried them all and decided that I wanted to create my own path.

Can you think of any key challenges you had to overcome and how did you battle them to get to where you are?

I think one of the biggest challenges is having to answer to your friends and family. They often tell you that “you work really hard but where’s the result?” Trying to explain them that no business starts in one day. You need time to establish it, try things, develop your own way of doing it etc… It takes time. It’s not easy to overcome because yes, you see the time you spend on it and the little result. But I think you need to have faith in yourself and just keep working. Hard work always pays off.

A more business oriented challenge is to simply to acknowledge that I was doing BUSINESS. I’m a designer by trade and in design schools they don’t tell you how to sell your brand, they tell you how to create brands for other people. I wasn’t prepared for the conviction and confidence you need in a business/sales role as well! However, I’ve learned that you just need to kick yourself out of your comfort zone and just go for it, and learn. Learning comes with practicing, the more you practice the better you become. Networking events are the best place to start.

What is the dream, or where would you like to see yourself in five or ten years?

What I’ve noticed from being a designer in an agency, there were 2 big challenges:

1. Facing a work environment that has a lack of culture or leadership, and feeling like a easily replaceable resource to the company

2. Confronting clients that are feeling let down by creative agencies because either the agency will just do whatever the client asks to get the invoice paid, or alternatively, the agency is so good that they simply don’t listen to their clients anymore and just do whatever they want to push out their own style out.

My ambition in creating my business was (and still is) to challenge those problems and prove the world that it is:

  1. Possible to do business AND have productive employees with open minded and healthy work environments (and I’m not talking about offering snacks at the cafeteria) and still make profit.
  2. Allow people to trust the creative industry again by offering them a real partnership on projects, based on honesty and a genuinely creative approach.

The dream is to develop this business into a proper agency with people on board, but most of all having the recognition from both the inside (employee) and the outside (clients) that we offer a truly different service than any other creative or marketing agency.

How do you find balancing lifestyle and downtime with your job?

TE-RRI-BLE

I’m a perfectionist (yes, a super cliché one!) which means, I don’t know when to stop. Then all of the sudden, my body just tells me off and I’m spending a whole day in bed (feeling super guilty of being in bed all day) because I just can’t do anything else.

It’s something I’m really working on. I’m trying to install routines and force myself to have work hours times and break times and “me” times. It is a long way to get there as I’m still “working too much” but when you’re your own boss and you have to manage every tiny piece of information and detail of your business, it’s hard to let go and find the time to stop.

I think this is another big challenge and I guess step by step you learn how to manage your time (and I’m still learning!).

If you could give one piece of advice to a young spark looking to start their business, what would that be?

Before your start I would recommend to sit down and take the time to list everything that’s involved in being your own boss:

  • being your own accountant/social media manager
  • to having to learn more about business or finding clients,
  • noticing that you might not make any profit in your first year and that you’ll have to make sacrifices on a lot of things… take the time to realise how much it will cost and take you to do it and what will be your responsibilities.

Now this list will be scary AS F. But you have to stay neutral to it and ask yourself honestly: am I ready for that?

If yes, then: Embrace your fears, jump out of your comfort zone, ask for help whenever you need it, build your network, believe in your work, work hard and do it!

To quote the film director Xavier Dolan who once said in Canne: “ I believe everything is possible to those who dream, dare, work and never give up”

What has been your favourite event you have attended this month? If not month, this year?

This month I’m very excited about the Q&A I’m hosting for students of my old  design school. They’re coming from France to meet with a few design agencies and I will meet them to answer their questions about what it’s like to starting up in London as a designer.

And finally, what do you think is the best part about being an upcoming, self-employed business owner right now?

I CAN DO IT MY WAY! I no longer get told “how it should be” or “how you should do” or “this is how WE do it, so you do it this way” etc. I get to create my own rules and how the business should be and this is delighting.

Thank you so much for talking to us and telling us about your experiences! We love your designs and blogs. Check out Lucie’s website/blog, follow her on Twitter and of course like her Facebook page

Do you have any tips or advice on how to overcome challenges in the working world? Let us know by talking to us on Twitter!

Why not email the author about featuring on the blog or getting in touch with yada Events app. rhys.terrar@yada.events

Try out the app and see how you can use it for your next event management project.

Download it on the App Store or Google Play and follow us

online:

www.yada.events

London Coffee Festival 2017 + UK CoffeeWeek

It may be obvious if you check our Twitter or Instagram religiously, but we’re fairly coffee keen. A day can’t go by without team yada enjoying a double shot latte macchiato, some cold brew or just your everyday caramel latte. So, when we saw there was a London Coffee Festival on the 6-9th of April and basically next door to yada HQ at the Old Truman Brewery…. Well, the tickets mysteriously bought themselves.

It’s safe to say that we weren’t incredibly sure what to expect. We love a good artisan coffee house, but a whole festival is another ball game entirely. Especially as we had to head down on what was supposedly the ‘trade/industry day’ (damn meetings). But the trade day made it better! Admittedly it was very packed, but every conversation we were in or overheard was filled with so much passion it made the day feel like a community meeting rather than a conference or industry day.

So, what happened at the Coffee Festival?

Well, once you make it in to the beautiful Truman Brewery you’re met with everything you could ever conceive of being related to everyone’s favourite caffeinated bev. There was all manner of different artisan roasterys (with more blends, grades and roasts of beans than you could imagine), machines, grinders and all sorts of cafe paraphernalia you never thought to exist! There were trying sections and displays (Oatly and Old Spike Roast were particularly delicious) and probably everyone’s favourite section… Latte Art Live!

Ever wondered how you get a coffee with a fern leaf or a heart? Well at stations all around the brewery you could try and learn for yourself, under the supervision of the ‘Coffee Masters’.  The crowds spoke for themselves, everyone wanted to be a barista for the day and it was quite the spectacle, even if some of the latte hearts looked more pear-like than anything.

Another great element of the festival was the coffee competitions (yep, you read competitions correctly). The festival gathered together as many coffee masters together and pit them in competition with each other to make the best cups of coffee possible using different methods.  You wouldn’t think making a cup of coffee could become a spectator sport, but with hosts to explain the nuances of everything going on, the choices of the competitors, and live judging. It became quite the event (and we do love events).

The three-day festival also ear marks the start of UK Coffee Week, from April 10-16th (Our new favourite week of the year). Which is a week-long fundraising initiative to raise money for Project Water! So, there will be lots of coffee events this week and loads of your favourite coffee shops will be giving proceeds to help support the charity. What’s not to love!

Check out London Coffee Fest here and UK Coffee Week here and make sure to follow us on Twitter! 

Why not email the author about featuring on the blog or getting in touch with yada Events app: rhys.terrar@yada.events

Try out the app and see how you can use it for your next event management project.

Download it on the App Store or Google Play and follow us

online:

www.yada.events

Work Hard – Play Hard. The King’s Parade.

These are a few interview style questions that we put to The Kings Parade about their battle with work life balance as they slogs it about in the city as an upcoming band.

Music and the arts are a big talking point right now with a move away from faceless corporate jobs towards the dream of ‘making your stamp on your industry’. But what is it really like for  young adults trying to make their way in an ever-condensing market of bands and musicians? Read their answers to find out.

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What is your role now and what are the main responsibilities for the band?

I think our role is to write music that we believe in and hope that we can connect with people in the process. At this stage we also have the mission of spreading the word to as many people as possible whilst earning a living, which is not always so easy…! 

 How long have you been doing this for and what did you do before?

Once we’d decided to try and pursue the career of the band, we realised that we needed to build up a little cash so that we could move to London. Fortunately for us, we managed to haggle our way to getting a job performing as the party band on a cruise ship around Hawaii and West America/Canada! We’re now in our 4th year of playing together as a band and we’re currently still working our own jobs too. We have part-time jobs working as teachers and musicians to try and make ends meet. It’s a surreal life coming back from tour, playing to amazing audiences, then coming straight back to teach Jimmy! Not that we don’t love Jimmy. 

Can you think of any key challenges you had to overcome and how did you battle them to get to where you are?

As much as we’d like them not to be, money and contacts; without these, a career in music in very tricky!! We were fortunate enough with the cruise to get the money to move to London, which we used to get a house together but actually living in London doesn’t come cheap… We all work mornings and this just about covers ourselves, but it wasn’t until we discovered busking that we were able to start funding the band itself. We started with covers and no merchandise whatsoever and it was just lucrative enough to keep us going! This was then followed by another breakthrough where we started performing our own original tunes and at the time had just produced our first demo CD that we were selling for £2. They sold unbelievably well that we went on to busk regularly and this funded producing the videos and tracks for our 1st EP. We were also lucky enough to meet some really useful industry connections through this and people who we are still working with to this day!

What is the dream, or where would you like to see yourself in five or ten years?

Of course for any band the dream is to headline huge festivals and play huge tours! But our first realistic dream is to live off the music, the music alone. If we can achieve this dream, then maybe we’ll dream a little higher.

How do you find balancing lifestyle and downtime with your job?

Sometimes it’s tricky when most days are spent working long hours, but we all get along well which makes everything a lot easier. We also live together which can be intense on top of everything else so sometimes it’s just a case of switching off to stop us driving each other crazy!! 

If you could give one piece of advice to a young spark looking to start up a band, what would that be?

Be prepared for a long uphill battle with plenty of highs and lows, but if you’re committed enough, then just maybe it’ll work out! 

What has been your favourite show you have played this month? If not month, this year?

That’s a tricky one as we’ve been lucky enough to have quite a few great shows over the last year. I think from an outsiders point a view the bigger the better, but it’s not always the case as I think we’d all agree that our favourite show from the past year was a recent night at The Islington with just 150 people, but 150 people who made us feel like we were playing the biggest show of our lives. 

And finally, what do you think is the best part about being an upcoming band right now?

No one knows how far this can go and ever day is so different! We can write the music that we want to write, and the feeling of performing this and spreading this around the world is quite unique and special.

Make sure to check out  The King’s parade here and listen to their music!

Do you have any tips or advice on how to overcome challenges in the working world? Let us know by talking to us on Twitter! 

Why not email the author about featuring on the blog or getting in touch with yada Events app: rhys.terrar@yada.events

Try out the app and see how you can use it for your next event management project.

Download it on the App Store or Google Play and follow us

online:

www.yada.events

Work Hard – Play Hard. Matt Scott.

These are a few interview style questions that we put to Matt about his battle with work life balance as his video agency London Filmed breaks into the Events industry.

Start-up projects and entrepreneurship are a big talking point right now with a move away from faceless corporate jobs towards the dream of ‘making your stamp on your industry’. But what is it really like for a young adult trying to make their way in an ever-condensing market of creatives and agencies? Read Matt’s answers to find out:

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What is your role now and what are the main responsibilities for you?

I am the creative director at London Filmed and City House Media.  Day to day I’ll be leading the team to figure out great campaign ideas, how we can integrate new technologies such as VR into events, and eating at least 2 basic meals of tuna and rice.

How long have you been doing this for and what did you do before?

I set up as a freelancer about 4 years ago.  I knew nothing about video.  Things started to move quickly and surprisingly l was quite good at it and it blossomed into what we are today.   Before that I started a bespoke footwear company, setting up a factory and Nike ID style website.  Sadly that failed.  

Can you think of any key challenges you had to overcome and how did you battle them to get to where you are?

Everyday is full of challenges, that’s part of the fun, but I guess the main challenge was learning to live on limited income and adhoc cashflow, while putting what would have been my wage back into the business to sometimes help it grow, sometimes help it stay alive.  Making sacrifices such as not having a fixed abode for a while and crashing on friends sofas (sometimes a hostel) here and there was probably the hardest.  

What is the dream, or where would you like to see yourself in five or ten years?

The dream is to build a company that produces great work, that really helps our clients.  We really want an investment in our work to pay off, and for our clients to see great ROI.  In ten years, if we’ve made even a little mark on the creative industry, that’ll be a good job done.

How do you find balancing lifestyle and downtime with your job?

Downtime?  That would have been what I’d of said last year.  But that was a mistake.  From Jan 2017 I’ve taken a different approach and ensure I don’t work weekends and I only work when I’m working efficiently.  If it’s 3pm and I’m not in the zone, I’ll pack up, take a few hours out and pick it up later.   I’m getting so much more done.

If you could give one piece of advice to a young spark looking to start their business, what would that be?

I give advice in 3’s:

  1. Get good with money if you’re not already.  
  2. Read The Lean Startup
  3. Don’t be shy to ask for help.

What has been your favourite event you have attended this month? If not month, this year?

The London Summer Event show, run by Story events.  Incredible theming and atmosphere, and just a generally great exhibition.

And finally, what do you think is the best part about being an upcoming, self-employed business owner right now?

Freedom.  Not just right now, but at any time.  

Thank you so much for talking to us and telling us about your experiences! We love your filming (especially seeing as you filmed our Jobbio videos…)

Take a look at some of Matt and his friend’s work below and if you want to see more about the London Summer Event show take a look at our review here.

Make sure to follow Matt and London Filmed here for updates on all their escapades!

Do you have any tips or advice on how to overcome challenges in the working world? Let us know by talking to us on Twitter!

Why not email the author about featuring on the blog or getting in touch with yada Events app. rhys.terrar@yada.events

Try out the app and see how you can use it for your next event management project.

Download it on the App Store or Google Play and follow us

online:

www.yada.events

 

London’s top St Paddy’s Parties

IRELAND

So, this Friday is St. Patrick’s Day, which really means this entire weekend is going to be filled with green paddy glee. But what events are out here in the far flung and very un-Irish land of London for everyone to celebrate? Don’t worry yada’s got you covered.

Well, first let’s cover the actual day (although your hangover will last longer…)

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Boxpark

Firstly, our favourite and thankfully very local space, Boxpark, is hosting a St. Paddy’s party sponsored by Ireland’s most famous Whiskey, Jameson. If you want Whiskey mixers, a beer pong tournament hosted by Porky’s BBQ and DJ Siggy Smalls on the decks proving a modern St. Patrick’s Day celebratory soundtrack the head here. All in all, if you’re looking for a chance to spend St. Paddy’s as you should (suitably boozed) then Shoreditch’s favourite pop-up hub is the place to go! Check out Boxpark here and for details to submit your Beer Pong team.

The Tube

It’s not what you’re thinking, the tube isn’t some ‘hip’ new club the kids are going to. We do actually mean the underground. This one’s less of something to hunt and attend, but if you’re getting the tube from Westminster, Tottenham Court Road or Southwark Tube stations, you can expect to see renditions of Irish music and poetry to make your journey a bit more jolly. Take a look at this previous year’s celebration.

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Camden Market

We all love a visit to Camden Market (if you haven’t been you need to go). You can take a look at the edgey garms, have a drink by the canal and have one of the best people watching sessions you’ll ever have in London. But what’s North London’s punk centre got planned for this year’s St. Paddy’s? By the looks of things… Everything. This Saturday you can see live Irish music across the market, experience family friendly fun such as dancing and crafts (A first for Camden), as well as screenings of the ENG v IRE Six Nations rugby final. And finally, live performances from top Irish bands MOXIE and Kíla… So, if you’re looking for a more alternative way to celebrate everything Irish, grab a Guinness and head down to Camden.

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Trafalgar Square

If you’re looking for something like Camden for some family friendly fun, but festivals are more your thing, then Trafalgar is the place to be. There will be performances by West End stars, Irish acts, a huge céilí on the Trafalgar Square stage. All hosted by Irish stand-up comedian Jarlath Regan.  Of course, there will be ample opportunity to sample some Irish beverages throughout. (We know what the yada crew is about…)

There you go, whether you’re looking for a party Paddy’s day or something a bit more mellow for this weekend’s celebration, yada’s got you covered and make sure to spend your time wisely when the grass is just a bit greener this weekend.

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